Who was Max Glucksmann and how did he influence tango?

The first of two articles about Max Glucksmann by Terence Clarke, novelist, journalist and Alma del Tango board member

 

Max Glucksmann’s is not a household name, to be sure. But were it not for him, the Argentine recording and film industries would not have developed as quickly as they did or –- especially in the recording of tango– with such formidable results.

An Austrian and part of the important Jewish immigration to Argentina in the nineteenth and twentieth  centuries,  Glucksmann arrived with his family in Buenos Aires in 1890, when he was 15 years old.  Max was a very industrious young man, and he went to work soon after his arrival in Argentina for  Lepage y Compañia, a photography studio. He was one of three employees in a shop that was seven by twenty-five meters in its entirety.  He often bragged later in life, shrugging his shoulders in the Buenos Aires manner of humorous acceptance of one’s fate, that his first salary was fifty pesos a month.  Even in 1890, this was not a lot. 

The arrival of moving pictures and voice recordings

Max Glucksmann, Argentine movie and recording industry mogul

Max Glucksmann, founder of Argentina’s cinema and recording industries in the early 20th Century.

Lepage y Compañia recognized the coming importance of the moving picture, and expanded its operations in 1900 to that primitive but exciting art.  In the meantime, the possibility for recording voice and music had also become a reality.  In a 1931 interview, Max explained what had been happening in Buenos Aires: “Forty years ago, the first Lioret phonographs were imported from France.  They used celluloid cylinders.  Then came cylinders made of wax. And finally in 1900 disks appeared, even though they were pretty bad.” 

Max understood that, although these first recordings were mostly by opera singers like Enrico Caruso, the real market lay in popular music artists of the period.  In a day in which radio was in its own infancy, these recordings were usually the only way that large numbers of people could hear different kinds of music. 

“When the gramophone really came into its own in Argentina,” Max said, “it was thanks to the popularity that, day by day, was enjoyed by criolla music (music from Argentina itself). From the time of the payadores (itinerant singers) like Negro Gazcón, Gabino Ezeiza, Villoldo and others, who were singing just as the disk was perfecting itself.”

Max, recognizing that cinema and recording were the coming industries, applied himself to his work so intently that, in 1908, when Lepage y Compañia now had one hundred fifty employees, he bought the company.  Soon thereafter, he built the first recording studio in Argentina, taking advantage of new technology that allowed recordings to be made by the thousands. He also worked to establish the legal rights of music authorship for performers, something that had not previously existed in Argentina.

Next month we’ll see the profound influence that one of Max Glucksmann’s first artists, Carlos Gardel, would have on tango and the world.

Terence Clarke’s new novel, The Splendid City, will be published next year.

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